Just because Halloween celebrates scary things doesn’t mean you want any safety scares of your own. With a little bit of planning and these five tips from Kids.gov, you can ensure your ghouls and goblins have a frightfully fun time this year.

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Five Tips to Make Your Halloween Safe

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Five Tips to Make Your Halloween SafeJust because Halloween celebrates scary things doesn’t mean you want any safety scares of your own. With a little bit of planning and these five tips from Kids.gov, you can ensure your ghouls and goblins have a frightfully fun time this year.

  1. Look up your local trick-or-treating time and rules. Then plot out a map of safe neighborhoods for trick-or-treating. Let older children take the map with them if they’re trick-or-treating on their own.
  2. Stick reflective tape on dark costumes—it will help drivers see you. And make sure your kids can see clearly. Face paint may work better than a mask when it comes to visibility. Read about applying face paint safely in FDA's Novelty Makeup page.
  3. Pick a perfect pumpkin for carving. It should be sturdy, not soft, with a flat bottom so it doesn’t topple over. You can also encourage your kids to paint creative faces on their pumpkins instead of carving.
  4. Consider using a glow stick or battery-powered lights instead of candles to light the way for trick-or-treating or in jack-o-lanterns, especially around little kids who could get burned or drapery that could catch fire.
  5. Screen candy before your kids eat it. Toss out anything with opened or damaged wrappers and homemade treats, unless you know the giver personally.


Don't forget basic safety precautions that will make your children's Halloween a safer night of fun. For more tips on having a healthy and fun Halloween, visit Kids.gov’s Halloween page.


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